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European Tax Awards 2013: closing date approaching

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The European Tax Awards are back in 2013, even bigger and better than before.

The closing date for entries is Monday February 4. The awards will be presented for the eighth time on May 15 at the Dorchester Hotel in London.

They will go to the firms that demonstrate examples of client work of the highest quality in Europe between January 1 2012 and December 31 2012. The winners and runners-up will also be presented in the June 2013 issue of the magazine. The hyperlinked entry forms below are your chance to enter your firm for the 75 awards on offer.

Two more in-house awards will be presented this year. In previous years, there was one award for direct tax and one for indirect. This year they have been split into two, so there will be a direct and and an indirect award for company tax departments with fewer than 10 members and the same for those with more than 10.

The best client connection award, which expands on the old award for best use of the internet, is for service providers who have used offline or online initiatives, such as meetings, seminars and publications, web seminars, e-mails or blogs, to boost interaction with existing and prospective clients.

The new European tax compliance and reporting award is for firms that have advised clients on the use of robust compliance and reporting solutions, for example, through outsourcing services or technology implementation.

Categories that were introduced for the first time last year, such as for European tax innovator of the year, will continue this year.

Awards will be presented to firms in these 27 jurisdictions or regions:

Austria, Baltic States (Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania), Belgium, Central and Eastern Europe (Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Romania, Slovenia and Slovak Republic), Cyprus, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Russia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, UK and Ukraine.

This list of award categories further explains what awards your firm can enter for and how to do this.

Submissions

To decide the winners, International Tax Review’s team of journalists will undertake detailed research from a variety of sources. Submissions from firms are a vital part of this research. The magazine’s editorial staff will also consult a large number of tax advisers and lawyers, tax executives and in-house counsel to gain their perspective on the ground-breaking work that took place in Europe between January 1 2012 and December 31 2012.

Shortlists will be compiled based on the submissions and research, and the winners will be chosen after a poll of international tax executives.

The awards will be judged according to:

  • Size (Not conclusive, though it does indicate what a tax team is capable of taking on)

  • Innovation (Did the solution the firm employed show something more than the straightforward answer that is commonly used?)

  • Complexity (Did the matter address tax issues that were out of the ordinary, and what ingenuity did the firm show to solve them?)

The award categories and details of how to submit entries are listed in hyperlinked files below. Your firm is invited to make separate submissions for as many of these categories as you wish.



Entry forms

National Tax Firm of the Year

National Transfer Pricing Firm of the Year

European Tax Firm of the Year

European Tax Disputes Firm of the Year

European Indirect Tax Firm of the Year

European In-house Team of the Year - Direct Tax >10 members

European In-house Team of the Year – Direct Tax <10 members

European In-house Team of the Year – Indirect Tax >10 members

European In-house Team of the Year – Indirect Tax <10 members

European Court of Justice Firm of the Year - Direct Tax

European Court of Justice Firm of the Year - Indirect Tax

European Tax Compliance and Reporting Firm of the Year

European Tax Policy Team of the Year

European Capital Markets Tax Team of the Year

European M&A Tax Team of the Year

European Private Equity Tax Team of the Year

European Media & Entertainment Tax Team of the Year

European Financial Services Tax Team of the Year

European Energy Tax Team of the Year

European Tax Innovator of the Year

Best Client Connection of the Year

Best Newcomer of the Year

US Tax Law Firm of the Year



Deadlines

Please fill out the forms and send as many details as possible, in attachments to your e-mail, by Monday February 4 2013 to rcunningham@euromoneyplc.com



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