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Hong Kong

Sarah Chin

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Deloitte Hong Kong

35/F One Pacific Place

88 Queensway, Admiralty

Hong Kong


Tel: +852 2852 6440

Email: sachin@deloitte.com.hk

Website: www.deloitte.com

Sarah Chin, Deloitte Hong Kong, is the tax and business advisory services leader – southern region. She is also the national and the Asia Pacific regional leader for indirect tax and customs at Deloitte China, and a member of the steering committee of Deloitte's global VAT and customs group.

Sarah started her career as an inspector with HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC) in the UK before entering the consulting profession. Sarah spent seven years in the UK, primarily advising on governmental issues and international VAT, before relocating to Switzerland where she spent eight years establishing an international VAT centre of excellence, prior to building and heading up an international VAT team in Switzerland for another Big 4 firm.

Sarah works with clients in planning and implementing complicated VAT and customs structures both in China and globally. Sarah is experienced in resolving some of the most complicated customs matters regarding TP valuations, classifications and anti-smuggling. Her interest also lies in implementing supply chain structures combining the optimal export VAT refund structure, and utilising customs driven reliefs. Although Sarah has in-depth experience in a number of industries such as luxury products, manufacturing, and the automotive industry, her specialism lies in the life science and pharmaceutical sector. Sarah is the global indirect tax and customs lead for some of Deloitte network's most strategic clients. For the past few years, Sarah has worked as a domestic adviser with the Chinese government on the design and approach of the VAT reform.

Sarah has written many articles and books in different publications including International Tax Review, Taxation, and CCH's China Tax Guide. She was quoted as a recognised tax adviser in the World Tax Guide by ITR in 2009, and was named as an indirect tax leader from 2012 to 2015. She has also been continuously recognised as a global leading indirect tax and customs adviser. Sarah is a chartered tax adviser with the Institute of Chartered Accountants of England and Wales. She also works as a recurring lecturer for the University of Zurich, University of Shanghai and University of Wuhan.

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Agnes Chan

EY

Elaine Chen

Clifford Chance

Tracy Ho

EY

Sharon Lam

Deloitte Hong Kong

Ayesha Macpherson Lau

KPMG

Amy Ling

Baker McKenzie

Lili Zheng

Deloitte Hong Kong

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