International Tax Review is part of the Delinian Group, Delinian Limited, 8 Bouverie Street, London, EC4Y 8AX, Registered in England & Wales, Company number 00954730
Copyright © Delinian Limited and its affiliated companies 2023

Accessibility | Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Modern Slavery Statement

European Tax Awards 2016: Submission period now open

Companies and firms can now enter for the European Tax Awards 2016. Entry information is available in the links below.

The closing date for submissions is Friday February 5 2016. The awards will be presented during a dinner at the Savoy in London on Thursday May 26 2016 in these categories:  

In addition to the awards for the best tax and transfer pricing firms in 27 jurisdictions or regions, including South Africa, the ceremony in 2016 will again feature the presentation of three separate awards to company tax departments, who can enter to be named the direct or indirect tax, or transfer pricing in-house team of the year. To win they must compose a 500-word description of their objectives for the 2015 calendar year and how they were achieved, highlighting areas where the work done by the team made a significant impact on the overall goals of the company.

Deals


There is aseparate submission form for the 11 deals of the year awards:

  • banking;

  • capital markets;

  • consumer products;

  • energy;

  • financial services;

  • joint ventures;

  • media and entertainment;

  • M&A;

  • private equity;

  • restructuring and

  • telecommunications and technology;

Any firm that worked on any of the tax aspects of the winning deals will receive an award.

Methodology

Between December 2014 and February 2015, law firms, tax advisers, accountants and other tax service providers from these jurisdictions:

Austria; Baltic States (Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania); Belgium; Central and Eastern Europe (Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Romania, Slovak Republic and Slovenia); Cyprus (no TP award); Denmark; Finland; France; Germany; Greece; Hungary; Ireland; Italy; Luxembourg; Malta (no TP award); Netherlands; Norway; Poland; Portugal; Russia; South Africa; Spain; Sweden; Switzerland; Turkey; UK and Ukraine

can submit three examples of their best work for consideration for the national tax and transfer pricing awards.

The awards for European Tax Firm of the Year, European Transfer Pricing Firm of the Year, US Tax Firm of the Year in Europe and Best Newcomer (international tax practices of <5 years) will be judged from these submissions.

There are separate submission forms for the European regional awards covering tax disputes, the European Court of Justice, indirect tax, tax compliance & reporting, innovation and tax technology.

The awards will be judged according to:

  • Size (Not conclusive, though it does indicate what a tax team is capable of taking on)

  • Innovation (Did the advice the firm gave show something more than the straightforward answer that is commonly used? Did the matter address tax issues that were out of the ordinary and what ingenuity did the firm show to solve them?)

  • Impact (What effect did the matter have on the client's business? Was it transformative? What has the conclusion of the matter enabled the client to achieve?)

If you wish to attend the awards dinner in London on May 26, please get in touch with Andrew Tappin.

more across site & bottom lb ros

More from across our site

The Brazilian government may be about to align the country’s unique system with OECD standards, but this is a long-awaited TP reform and success is uncertain.
Two months since EU political agreement on pillar two and few member states have made progress on new national laws, but the arrival of OECD technical guidance should quicken the pace. Ralph Cunningham reports.
It’s one of the great ironies of recent history that a populist Republican may have helped make international tax policy more progressive.
Lawmakers have up to 120 days to decide the future of Brazil’s unique transfer pricing rules, but many taxpayers are wary of radical change.
Shell reports profits of £32.2 billion, prompting calls for higher taxes on energy companies, while the IMF warns Australia to raise taxes to sustain public spending.
Governments now have the final OECD guidance on how to implement the 15% global minimum corporate tax rate.
The Indian company, which is contesting the bill, has a family connection to UK Prime Minister Rishi Sunak – whose government has just been hit by a tax scandal.
Developments included calls for tax reform in Malaysia and the US, concerns about the level of the VAT threshold in the UK, Ukraine’s preparations for EU accession, and more.
A steady stream of countries has announced steps towards implementing pillar two, but Korea has got there first. Ralph Cunningham finds out what tax executives should do next.
The BEPS Monitoring Group has found a rare point of agreement with business bodies advocating an EU-wide one-stop-shop for compliance under BEFIT.