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World Tax 2016 and World Transfer Pricing 2016: Research opens in May 2015

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The research will start for the 2016 editions of World Tax and World Transfer Pricing in May 2015. Please watch this website closely for further information.

This guide provides more information about how World Transfer Pricing 2015 was researched and how the results will be produced. And this one tells you more about the World Tax 2015 process. They will broadly similar for 2016.

World Tax and World Transfer Pricing 2016 will feature editorial and rankings of firms in 56 jurisdictions around the world. Though the return of a questionnaire does not mean a firm will definitely be included in the editorial, it means the writers will be aware of the firm and will thoroughly, and independently, research the information provided.

After the questionnaires(Please don't use these ones for 2016. They are only a guide.) have been submitted, the writers will follow up with interviews with tax directors and the senior tax leaders of the firms that have made a submission. They will also interview clients whose contact details you provide for an objective, independent view of the market. This will help them come up with a ranking for each jurisdiction, based on the submissions and interviews.

These are the countries that will be covered:

Asia-Pacific

Australia, China, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan and Vietnam.

Europe

Austria, Baltic States, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine and UK.

Middle East and Africa

Gulf Cooperation Council, Israel and South Africa.

North America

Canada, Mexico and US - Chicago, Houston/Dallas, Los Angeles, New York, San Francisco and Silicon Valley and Washington, DC.

South America

Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Peru, Uruguay and Venezuela.


To promote your firm in the online or print versions of the TP directory, or the World Transfer Pricing app, please contact Megan Poundall, mpoundall@euromoneyplc.com +44(0)207 779 8325

To promote your firm in the online or print versions of the World Tax directory, please contact Andrew Tappin, atappin@euromoneyplc.com +44(0)207 779 8661


more across site & bottom lb ros

More from across our site

A steady stream of countries has announced steps towards implementing pillar two, but Korea has got there first. Ralph Cunningham finds out what tax executives should do next.
The BEPS Monitoring Group has found a rare point of agreement with business bodies advocating an EU-wide one-stop-shop for compliance under BEFIT.
Former PwC partner Peter-John Collins has been banned from serving as a tax agent in Australia, while Brazil reports its best-ever year of tax collection on record.
Industry groups are concerned about the shift away from the ALP towards formulary apportionment as part of a common consolidated corporate tax base across the EU.
The former tax official in Italy will take up her post in April.
With marked economic disruption matched by a frenetic rate of regulatory upheaval, ITR partnered with Asia’s leading legal minds to navigate the continent’s growing complexity.
Lawmakers seem more reticent than ever to make ambitious tax proposals since the disastrous ‘mini-budget’ last September, but the country needs serious change.
The panel, the only one dedicated to tax at the World Economic Forum, comprised government ministers and other officials.
Colombian Finance Minister José Antonio Ocampo announced preparations for a Latin American tax summit, while the potentially ‘dangerous’ Inflation Reduction Act has come under fire.
The OECD’s two-pillar solution may increase global tax revenue gains by more than $200 billion a year, but pillar one is the key to such gains due to its fundamental changes to taxing rights.