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Hungary

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Zoltán Várszegi

Réti, Antall & Partners Law Firm / PwC Legal

H-1055 Budapest

Bajcsy-Zsilinszky út 78.

Hungary

Tel: +36 1 461 9506

Email: zoltan.varszegi@hu.pwclegal.com

Website: www.retiantallpartners.hu

Zoltán Várszegi is a member of Réti, Antall & Partners Law Firm – PwC Legal in Budapest, Hungary. He is an experienced lawyer with 20 years' of experience in various legal fields including tax and customs litigation, M&A, corporate restructuring, energy law, public utilities, civil law litigation, and so on. He advises a broad range of clients in different industries including the electricity supply, financial services, public transport organisation, energy production and supply, and manufacturing sectors.

Zoltán has acted as the legal representative of both domestic and international companies as defendant before the court in tax litigation cases. Most of these cases require highly versatile legal approaches to countervail proceedings initiated by the tax authority.

Zoltán leads the tax litigation practice group of PwC Legal Hungary, which is a unique player in the legal services market in Hungary as it is the only Hungarian qualified law firm that has a long-standing cooperation with a Big 4 advisory firm.

His clients include some of the largest multinational companies, from all industry sectors, such as financial services, energy, automotive, industrial manufacturing, and telecommunications. His experience is not limited to the most common taxes such as VAT or corporate income tax but also to personal income tax, local business tax, other indirect taxes (energy tax, innovation and education contribution) and tax administration. Zoltán also participates in general tax advisory services in cooperation with PwC (involving the tax-driven structuring of groups of companies).

Zoltán has also gained significant experience in tax cases involving the application of EU law and the practice of the European Court of Justice. PwC Legal is one of the few firms in Hungary that have been successful in convincing the court to apply EU law over the provisions of national tax law.

Zoltán graduated from Eötvös Loránd University, Faculty of Law as doctor iuris. He speaks both Hungarian and English.

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