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Global Tax 50 2015: Robert Stack

Deputy assistant secretary for international tax affairs, US Treasury

Robert Stack

Robert Stack was also in the Global Tax 50 2014

Last year, the Global Tax 50 praised Robert Stack for bucking the trend of reticence among tax officials. The US BEPS representative did not shrink away from the spotlight, contributing widely to media discussion of relevant issues and speaking regularly at related events.

This year, Stack has been praised in particular for defending the rights and interests of the US in multilateral BEPS discussions as part of his role as the lead US delegate to the OECD's Committee on Fiscal Affairs.

With many of his compatriots viewing BEPS discussions as an attack on the US, Stack staunchly defended the arm's-length principle and pushed back against proposed changes to digital economy taxation, among other things.

Stack also criticised the UK's unilateral action to introduce a diverted profits tax (DPT) ahead of final BEPS deliverables. His denunciation of the UK's move – which he said hindered further progress at the OECD-level – also flies in the face of criticism that the US would not actively engage with the multilateral BEPS discussions.

"We understand governments are under enormous pressure to raise revenue and it must be tempting to target non-residents," he said, before expressing his disappointment at the DPT at an event later in the year, at which he went on to say that the DPT's introduction was probably motivated by the impending general election and a desire on the part of the government to be seen as employing a tougher stance on multinational tax avoidance than the opposition Labour party.

"[This] puts a spotlight on the degree to which political pressure can trump policy," said Stack.

The Global Tax 50 2015

View the full list and introduction

The top 10 • Ranked in order of influence

1. Margrethe Vestager

2. Pascal Saint-Amans

3. Wang Jun

4. Arun Jaitley

5. Marissa Mayer

6. Will Morris

7. Ian Read

8. Pierre Moscovici

9. Donato Raponi

10. Global Alliance for Tax Justice

The remaining 40 • In alphabetic order

Brigitte Alepin

Andrus Ansip

Tamara Ashford

Mohammed Amine Baina

Piet Battiau

Elise Bean

Monica Bhatia

David Bradbury

Winnie Byanyima

Mauricio Cardenas

Allison Christians

Rita de la Feria

Marlies de Ruiter

Judith Freedman

Meg Hillier

Vanessa Houlder

Kim Jacinto-Henares

Eva Joly

Chris Jordan

Jean-Claude Juncker

Alain Lamassoure

Juliane Kokott

Armando Lara Yaffar

Liao Tizhong

Paige Marvel

Angela Merkel

Zach Mider

Richard Murphy

George Osborne

Achim Pross

Akhilesh Ranjan

Alan Robertson

Paul Ryan

Tove Maria Ryding

Magdalena Sepulveda Carmona

Lee Sheppard

Parthasarathi Shome

Robert Stack

Mike Williams

Ya-wen Yang

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