All material subject to strictly enforced copyright laws. © 2022 ITR is part of the Euromoney Institutional Investor PLC group.

The jewel of Europe

International Tax Review has partnered with several Swiss tax advisors to give you the key tax takeaways for the year ahead on everything from information exchanges, to tax incentives and audits

Switzerland is a peculiar European country.Nestled hundreds of metres into the Alps, it has the GDP and population of an eastern European economy, but houses roughly 30% of the Fortune 500 in some capacity.

In the world of fund management, it may not see the level of currency regional neighbours like Luxembourg may see circulate through its borders on behalf of institutional investors, but to individuals, family offices and private bankers the world over, it has served as a virtual money pit thanks to a long history of banking secrecy laws.

But what makes Switzerland such a desirable place for business? One can argue that historically, it has always had a competitive tax rate, but today, that is a race being lost in Europe as the likes of American giants such as BlackRock and Facebook flock to cities like Budapest and Dublin to set up European operations, where corporate tax rates can hit as low as 9% and 12.5%, respectively.

Globally, that margin is slipping even further as the US largely halves its corporate tax rate to 21%, while the UK's (still Europe) 19% seems negligible to Switzerland's 18%.

It is no surprise then that corporate tax reform has remained a big issue in Switzerland in recent years, with 2019 no exception as tax reform goes to a second referendum in May.

To answer many of your queries, International Tax Review has partnered with several Swiss tax advisors to give you the key tax takeaways for the year ahead on everything from information exchanges, to tax incentives and audits.

We hope you find the 2019 guide useful.

Dan Barabas

Commercial editor

International Tax Review

more across site & bottom lb ros

More from across our site

The UN’s decision to seek a leadership role in global tax policy could be a crucial turning point but won’t be the end of the OECD, say tax experts.
The UN may be set to assume a global role in tax policy that would rival the OECD, while automakers lobby the US to change its tax rules on Chinese materials.
Companies including Valentino and EveryMatrix say the early adoption of EU public CbCR rules could boost transparency of local and foreign MNEs, despite the short notice.
ITR invites tax firms, in-house teams, and tax professionals to make submissions for the 2023 ITR Tax Awards in Asia-Pacific, Europe Middle East & Africa, and the Americas.
Tax authorities and customs are failing multinationals by creating uncertainty with contradictory assessment and guidance, say in-house tax directors.
The CJEU said the General Court erred in law when it ruled that both companies benefitted from Italian state aid.
An OECD report reveals multinationals have continued to shift profits to low-tax jurisdictions, reinforcing the case for strong multilateral action in response.
The UK government announced plans to increase taxes on oil and gas profits, while the Irish government considers its next move on tax reform.
War and COVID have highlighted companies’ unpreparedness to deal with sudden geo-political changes, say TP specialists.
A source who has seen the draft law said it brings clarity on intangibles and other areas of TP including tax planning.