Dentons Boekel opens tax practice in Netherlands
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Dentons Boekel opens tax practice in Netherlands

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Dentons Boekels has launched its first Dutch tax practice in Amsterdam with the hire of four partners from Baker McKenzie.

Dentons, the world’s largest law firm, said that this was just the first part of its strategy for the Netherlands. The firm has more than 7,700 lawyers across the globe. It entered the Dutch market through a merger with Boekel, a Dutch law firm.

“Having a solid tax practice in the Netherlands is an absolute must for our global firm and for our global tax practice in particular to serve our global client base,” said Tomasz Dabrowski, CEO of Dentons Europe. “We will continue to invest in top legal talent in key practices and sectors.”

The four partners hired in Dentons’ Dutch office are Jurjen Bevers, Paul Halprin, Heico Reinoud and Marnix Veldhuijzen, who are all joining from Baker McKenzie’s Amsterdam office.

Halprin focuses on transactions and tax dispute resolution, specialising in transfer pricing litigation, tax litigation, Dutch and international tax law and real estate. He has previously worked for Loyens & Loeff and IBFD, and has also taught an international taxation course at a German university.

Bevers has spent nearly all of his professional career of 15 years at Baker McKenzie and advises on international taxation, Dutch corporate income tax and Dutch state profit tax. He is particularly experienced in the oil and gas industry.

Reinoud started his career with Loyens & Volkmaars in 1996, before moving on to Loyens & Loeff and later KPMG. He spent eight and a half years in his previous role as a tax partner at Baker McKenzie, working with M&A, real estate transactions, securitisations, holding structures, financing structures, licensing structures, treasury and cash pooling and fund structures. He also advises clients on transfer pricing matters such as advance pricing agreements and advance tax rulings, and assists in negotiations with the tax authorities.

Marnix Veldhuijzen worked at Baker McKenzie for nearly nine years before joining Dentons. His focus is on Dutch private equity firms, family offices and privately-owned Dutch companies and shareholders. He works with Dutch corporate tax law, personal income tax law, and gift and inheritance tax law.

Sandra Hazan, co-head of Dentons’ global tax group, said the establishment of the tax team in the Netherlands is part of Dentons’ strategy to build a market-leading tax practice in Benelux and more widely in Europe. “With these new additions, we now have more than 90 tax lawyers in Europe. Dentons is the fastest growing tax practice on the continent with more than 40 new joiners over the last two years,” she said.  

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