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Let’s get digital

28 May 2019

Joe Stanley-Smith

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While some of the answers on how to tax the digital economy are not going to be what everyone likes, we have to admit they make for good conversation. The OECD has to handle things just right. For India, though, there's nothing left to talk about unless it's formulary.

While some of the answers on how to tax the digital economy are not going to be what everyone likes, we have to admit they make for good conversation. The OECD has to handle things just right. For India, though, there's nothing left to talk about unless it's formulary.

It's been a big few months for anyone who's getting digital. First, we had the release of public comments on the OECD's public consultation. This was a hotly anticipated event in ITR's London office, and although we had to be patient before getting our hands on them, it was worth the wait. There were a range of views, as one might expect, and on pages 12-21 our reporters, plus myself, have analysed companies' views on the three main suggestions.

In addition, we have an exclusive interview with a representative from a multinational group that used the public comments to present their own vision of formulary apportionment.

Getting digital tax consensus was always going be a tough ask for the OECD, and they'll be feeling the heat even more after India made its point of view clear by releasing its own proposals – and call for public comment – in April. You can see expert analysis on page 24.

But it's not only in corporate tax that digital issues are taking centre stage. Indirect tax is also getting into the digital swing of things through e-invoicing. This magazine issue doesn't hold back on the topic, with articles on pages 30, 32 and 26.

As if that wasn't enough digital action, we've also taken a look at potential applications of blockchain in Mexico (page 65), have coverage of recent events from three different locations: The Asia Tax Forum (page 50), Indirect Tax Forum (page 26) and Managing Global Tax Disputes Summit (page 46).

All of the aforementioned articles are aimed at getting the taxpayer perspective, and no piece typifies this approach more than our cover story (page 40), in which senior reporter and resident transfer pricing expert Josh White surveyed more than 60 companies on their use of intellectual property.

On top of that, we have our regular sections of news analysis (page 6) and international updates (page 70), as well as columns from Keith Brockman (page 3) and Sandy Markwick (page 64), as well as Giles Parsons (page 82), who is pondering the question of what the digital future will mean for the advisory profession.

Do remember, if you ever feel the need to get even more digital than the pages of International Tax Review magazine, we have plenty more coverage of the most pressing issues in tax today at www.internationaltaxreview.com

Joe Stanley-Smith
Editor, International Tax Review
joseph.stanley-smith@euromoneyplc.com






International Correspondents