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  • Sharing the spoils in Asia Pacific

    Asia's top advisers are sitting pretty. Work in China continues to develop at a frantic pace, and Japan has bounced back with an increased appetite for tax planning. More changes are due and clients are calling for more firms to get in on the act. Rufus Jones reports


Features

  • Australia forges ahead on reforms

    Australia is now at the mid-point in what purports to be the total overhaul of its direct and indirect tax system. Peter McCullough of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu, Australia and Ali Noroozi of Linklaters, UK detail the proposed changes

  • Protecting your assets in Japan

    Successfully buying into a Japanese business turns on a complex interaction of acquirer, target and seller considerations. Dean Yoost, Takuro Tagai and Al Zencak of PricewaterhouseCoopers, Tokyo detail the most important issues

  • The Revenue takes a hard line

    The biggest surprise in the UK’s 2000 budget came in the form of the abolition of offshore mixers. This is just one aspect of a toughening of the Inland Revenue’s stance across the board. Helen Lethaby and Susan Bell of Freshfields, London outline the aggressive new regime

  • Weighing up Canadian thin cap options

    The Canadian government has cherrypicked from the Mintz Report to introduce a series of reforms to Canada's thin capitalization rules. Elinore Richardson of Stikeman Elliott, Montreal, outlines the changes and reviews the rationale behind them

  • Reviving the Swiss branch concept

    The classic concept of a Swiss finance branch has been experiencing an impressive revival. Stefan Widmer and Matthias Blom of Arthur Andersen, Zurich advise on how to expand the concept to a wide range of treasury functions and adapt it to a group's intangible properties

  • Sharing the spoils in Asia Pacific

    Asia's top advisers are sitting pretty. Work in China continues to develop at a frantic pace, and Japan has bounced back with an increased appetite for tax planning. More changes are due and clients are calling for more firms to get in on the act. Rufus Jones reports


News Analysis


International Correspondents


International Correspondents